The other side of Italian Emigration: storming the Working Holiday Program in Canada

Every year the Citizenship and Immigration department of the Canadian Government (CIC) offers the opportunity to many Italians, as well as citizens of other partner countries, to work in Canada for a temporary period and explore the country. Italy has sent thousands of citizens and many are trying to enter the contest every year.

What many Italians do not know, is the real purpose of this project, called IEC (International Experience Canada). As its name says, it is simply an opportunity to spend 6 months working in a foreign country and 6 more months are given to explore the country after having worked. It is an experience, not a way to migrate there. However, many Italians think that since the crisis does not seem to end, they might try this type of “easy way” to get into Canada and be able to get a sponsor and be granted Permanent Residence. Continue reading

The Italian Exodus: the faucet that won’t stop spilling water

It is no surprise that Italy has been having a long and rich immigration history, especially since the year of the unification, 1861. What surprises people the most, though, is the fact that this phenomenon has been going on for a long time and it is hardly going to stop any time soon.
But is the government doing something to prevent such a hemorrhage? Are there any ways to try to stop the growing numbers of Italians who, after more than 150 years, are still leaving their country to find a better life or a job?
Sadly the answer is not going to be very positive.

Continue reading

Bamboccioni, “choosy” and brain drain: what’s the real situation in Italy?

Who knows what inspired the Italian politicians who decided to call young people names, however, one thing is sure: the employment situation in Italy is not one of the best in Europe, and this makes many people decide to leave their home country looking for a better opportunity or a better future.

To analyze this phenomenon in a closer way, a survey has been made among students and young Italian workers who are still living in Italy, many because of their studies, others because they were lucky enough to find a job. Moreover, many articles have been written on such matter, because the so-called brain drain is one of the biggest issues of Italy nowadays, when the new government is trying to change the labor policies, as well as the economic ones, in order to help Italy against this wavy sea that is making it sink.

But what do Italians think about all this? The survey answers speak very clearly, and they are the results of what runs into the mind of individuals in the age range of 18-29.  Continue reading

White racism? The sad story of a 19 year-old Italian worker in the UK.

Who was Joele Leotta? Many people do not have a clue. He was a 19 year-old boy from northern Italy, who decided to move abroad to look for some job opportunities, since the situation in Italy is not really one of the easiest and happiest. Many young graduates like him do the same choice, and that’s what I am aiming to when I will be done with my Bachelor’s studies. The fact is that Italy doesn’t offer people anything right now, it seems like it has gone back to the mid 20th century, when many Italians left to go “anywhere but home” to be able to earn a couple of coins to give food to their family or to just build one.
Joele reminds these immigrants who left with nothing and went to countries which could offer them something more than just unemployment and poverty.  Continue reading

Marcinelle, 57 years after

What happened on August 8, 1956 in Belgium? Many people, including a large number of migrants died because of a tragical disaster that occurred in the mines of Marcinelle, Belgium, where a lot of foreign immigrants went to work in those years. Most of them were Italians, escaping from the country that was not giving them a lot of job opportunities. They chose Belgium because it sounded like a good place where to make money to bring back home to Italy. Many of them in fact, didn’t move permanently. They worked there to earn more money to help their families back in their hometowns. 262 people died in the disaster, many were missing and only a few survived. But what really happened on that day?  Continue reading